Student Admissions, Outcomes, and Other Data

 

Time to completion for all students entering the program

Outcome

Year in which Degrees were Conferred

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

Total

Total number of students with doctoral degree conferred on transcript

3

5

10

8

2

2

6

36

Mean number of years to complete the program

7.3

7.2

7

7.4

7

7

6.8

7.1

Median number of years to complete the program

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

Time to Degree Ranges

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Students in less than 5 years

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Students in 5 years

0

0

1

20

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

Students in 6 years

2

67

1

20

4

40

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

9

9

25

Students in 7 years

0

0

1

20

3

30

5

63

2

100

2

100

3

60

16

44

Students in more than 7 years

1

33

2

40

3

30

3

38

0

0

0

0

1

10

10

28

Students will occasionally receive credit for prior graduate work.  Our experience is that students who have prior graduate work do not complete our program much more quickly than students who have no prior graduate work.

Program Costs

Description

2016-2017
1st-year Cohort Cost

Tuition for full-time students (in-state)

$8,856

Tuition for full-time students (out-of-state)

$26,460

Tuition per credit hour for part-time students

$492 (0-1 sh)

University/institution fees or costs

$1,501

Additional estimated fees or costs to students (e.g. books, travel, etc.)

$1,240

All graduate students are supported for at least five years if they remain in good standing.  Support includes a stipend of $18,816 plus a tuition scholarship, plus 25% of mandatory fees (~$254). In addition, two months of summer support is normally provided.

Internship Placement - Table 1

Outcome

Year Applied for Internship

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Students who obtained APA/CPA-accredited internships

7

100

9

100

1

100

2

100

2

100

7

100

4

100

Students who obtained APPIC member internships that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Students who obtained other membership organization internships (e.g. CAPIC) that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Students who obtained  internships conforming to CDSPP guidelines that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Students who obtained other internships that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Students who obtained any internship

7

100

9

100

1

100

2

100

2

100

7

100

4

100

Students who sought or applied for internships including those who withdrew from the application process

7

-

9

-

1

-

2

-

2

-

7

-

4

-

 

Internship Placement - Table 2

Outcome

Year Applied for Internship

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Students who sought or applied for internships including those who withdrew from the application process

7

-

9

-

1

-

2

-

2

-

7

-

4

-

Students who obtained paid internships

7

100

9

100

1

100

2

100

2

100

7

100

4

100

Students who obtained half-time internships

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Attrition

Variable

Year of First Enrollment

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Students for whom this is the year of first enrollment (i.e. new students)

3

-

6

-

4

-

6

-

6

-

2

-

4

-

Students whose doctoral degrees were conferred on their transcripts

3

100

2

33

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Students still enrolled in program

0

0

4

67

4

100

5

83

6

100

2

100

2

100

Students no longer enrolled for any reason other than conferral of doctoral degree

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

17

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Licensure

Outcome

2006 to 2016

The total number of program graduates (doctoral degrees conferred on transcript) between 2 and 10 years ago

40

The number of these graduates (between 2 and 10 years ago) who became licensed psychologists in the past 10 years

29

Licensure percentage

73%

 

Summary of Applications and Admissions

U Iowa, Clinical Psychology Program: Application & Matriculation Data

Year of Entry:

'10-'11

'11-'12

'12-'13

'13-'14

'14-'15

'15-'16

'16-'17

# Applicants

111

127

140

140

87

102

108

# Accepted for Admission

10

5

7

7

3

8

6

# Entering Class

6

4

6

6

2

4

2

# Minority, Entering Class

1

2

1

1

0

1

1

% Minority, Entering Class

17%

50%

17%

17%

0%

25%

50%

 

GRE-Verbal

           

 

Mean

623

622

627

164

160

161

164

Median

625

620

610

164

161

162

164

GRE-Quantitative

         

 

Mean

697

762

670

158

159

158

155

Median

695

760

690

156

159

159

155

GRE-Analytical Writing

           

 

Mean

5.1

4.4

5

4.6

5

4.7

4.5

Median

5.5

4.5

5

4.5

5

5

4.5

Undergraduate GPA

         

 

Mean

3.73

3.58

3.71

3.85

3.83

3.79

3.88

Median

3.76

3.86

3.78

3.86

3.90

3.90

3.88

 

Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS) Outcome Information

The clinical program measures its success by the post-Ph.D. trajectories of its students. We recognize, of course, that a host of circumstances and influences outside the graduate program can determine occupational choices and career trajectories of students. Still, it is the goal of the program to train graduate students who will be the next generation of clinical scientists, conducting basic and applied research, and taking positions in academic institutions, medical schools, and agencies where a premium is placed on empirical work and science-based services. The indices of success that the program uses to measure the realization of its aspirations include post-Ph.D. employment (including research post-doctoral appointments), post-Ph.D. publications of empirical work relevant to clinical science, success in securing grant support for that work, and the delivery of clinical service that is evidence-based.

At the time of our PCSAS self-study (2011), the Department had awarded 42 Ph.D. degrees to students in the clinical area over the prior 10 years. To evaluate the program's success, we reviewed the vitae of those students, or obtained information about their post-Ph.D. positions and their professional activities from publicly available sources. The vita of those graduates, as well as additional information that was obtained, was used to classify the Ph.D. recipients into four categories of outcome success (unsuccessful, marginally successful, successful, exemplary success). The criteria for each classification were commensurate with the guidelines promulgated by the PCSAS (see http://www.pcsas.org). Graduates who conducted sustained, and significant, clinically-relevant research post-Ph.D. were classified as exemplary clinical-science outcomes (31.0%). All of these students received their Ph.D. prior to 2007, as none of the more recent Ph.Ds. has had sufficient opportunity to demonstrate sustained significant contributions. Graduates who continued to engage in clinical research post-PhD were classified as successful clinical-science outcomes (45.3%). Three graduates (7.1%) were classified as marginally successful clinical-science outcomes, as they were not making significant contributions to clinical research, but they were providing evidence-based clinical services. Finally, the seven graduates for whom we had no evidence that they were pursuing a psychologically relevant science-based career were classified as unsuccessful (16.7%) clinical science outcomes. These "unsuccessful" clinical science outcome graduates were either engaged in a variety of post-Ph.D. clinical or administrative activities, but some were no longer professionally active in the field.

As a general characterization of the graduates of the last decade, 76.2% continued to make significant research contributions to clinical psychology post-PhD, and 83.3% continued to make science-based contributions to the field of clinical psychology, including clinical service.

 

Last updated: 8/19/2016