Seminars

Attendance at BBIP seminars is required for all students in the training program and is restricted to students and faculty of the BBIP.  Seminars are held in 109 Stuit Hall. If you are interested in attending a seminar, please contact program director Susan Lutgendorf. 

  • Presentation Techniques - Structure and Style by Lisa Kelly and Elizabeth Savelkoul

    January 29, 2019 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm

    Lisa Kelly and Elizabeth Savelkoul from the University of Iowa Graduate College will give a workshop to the group regarding presentation techniques, including ideas for structure and style  

  • Seminar Speaker: Nandakumar Narayana, MD, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Neurology, University of Iowa

    February 12, 2019 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm

    Dr. Narayanan's research is primarily interested is cognitive dysfunction in Parkinsons disease. His current work focuses on the influence of dopamine on prefrontal networks controlling cognitive behaviors such as timing and performance monitoring. His laboratory combines ensemble recording from populations of neurons in awake, behaving animals with specific manipulations using techniques such as optogenetic stimulation, targeted pharmacology, or selective genetic disruption with RNA interference.  His rseearch program is aimed at identifying new treatment strategies that can be translated to a clinical setting.

    In addition to being a biomedical in the BBIP, Dr. Narayanan is the Assistant Director of the Clinical Neuroscientst Training Program in Neurology and the Assistant Director of the Training Program in Neurology.  He will discuss his research program and lab activities with the group as well as his own training experiences and thoughts on doctoral training in the biomedical sciences.

  • Specific Aims Workshop - Part 1

    February 26, 2019 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm
  • Specific Aims Workshop - Part 2

    March 12, 2019 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm
  • Seminar Speaker: George Weiner, MD, Professor of Internal Medicine and Director of the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa

    March 26, 2019 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm

    Dr. Weiner’s research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies, and on development of novel approaches to immunotherapy of lymphoma. He has been continually funded by the NCI since 1991 and has been the PI on the University of Iowa / Mayo Clinic Lymphoma Specialized Program of Research Excellence (P50 CA097274) since it was initiated in 2002. This grant was renewed competitively in 2007 and 2012. Dr. Weiner’s research extends from basic laboratory investigation to clinical trials. He was the first to demonstrate Toll Like Receptor 9 agonists could be used successfully as immune adjuvants in tumor immunization. He has made major contributions to our understanding of the mechanisms of action responsible for the anti-tumor activity of monoclonal antibodies, including providing evidence that, in some cases, complement can inhibit the efficacy of some monoclonal antibodies. He has established a number of collaborative research programs, including working with Dr. Aliasger Salem from the UI College of Pharmacy on novel uses of nanoparticles to enhance the anti-tumor immune response.

     

    In addition to serving as a biomedical mentor in the BBIP, Dr. Weiner is also invovled in the numerous training programs in the College of Medicine, including the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Informatics, the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Translational Biomedicine,  and the Medical Scientist Training Program.  Dr. Weiner will share findings from his research as well as describe the ongoing research in his lab.  He will also discuss his perspectives on training for 21st century behavioral-biomedical scientists.

     

  • Pitching Research Ideas Outside of Academia

    April 9, 2019 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm

Past Events

  • Seminar Speaker: Donna Hammond, Ph.D., Professor of Anasthesia, Professor of Pharmacology, University of Iowa

    January 15, 2019 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm

    Dr. Hammond's program focuses on gaining a better understanding of the neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropharmacology of the central nervous system pathways that convey pain, as well as the bulbospinal pathways that modulate the transmission of nociceptive information. Her studies emphasize a systems-level approach that uses many different methodologies in concert, including behavioral pharmacology in normal, transgenic or knockout animals, neuroanatomical tract tracing, immunocytochemical labeling of neurons, measurement of neurotransmitter release by push-pull perfusion or microdialysis, and electrophysiological recordings from neurons in slices of the spinal cord or brainstem. Her work has been specifically understanding the role inhibitory neurotransmitters, such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or the endogenous opioid peptides, play in the modulation of nociceptive sensitivity at the level of the spinal cord and brainstem. Findings from your her work indicate that persistent pain can lead to long-term changes in the pharmacology and physiology of both the afferent pathways that convey pain, as well as the efferent pathways that suppress pain. These changes have significant consequences for the ability of drugs to produce analgesia and for the body to invoke its own homeostatic mechanisms for the control of pain.

    Dr. Hammond is a biomedical mentor in the BBIP program as well as member fo the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Neuroscience, the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Neuroscience, and the Medical Scientst Training Program.  She will present to the group about her research and work ongoing in her lab as well as discuss her own training experiences and thoughts on training the next generation of behavioral-biomedical scientists. 

  • Guest Speaker: Karin Hoth, Ph.D.

    November 27, 2018 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm

    Dr. Hoth's presentation will focus on her career path and her current program of research.  Dr. Hoth's research examines cognitive functioning among individuals with chronic medical illnesses. Her primary focus is on better understanding how pulmonary and cardiovascular dysfunction contribute to cognitive impairment among adults with COPD and related pulmonary conditions.

  • Guest Speaker: Mark Blumberg, Ph.D.

    November 13, 2018 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm

    Dr. Mark Blumberg is a faculty mentor in the BBIP program and currently the DEO of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.  Dr. Blumberg will discuss his research interests and career path with the BBIP group.  Dr. Blumberg's research program examines the neural bases and functions of sleep, including the developmental contributions of sleep-related spontaneous motor activity to sensorimotor integration.  His work utilizes multiple methodologies to decipher how biological rhythms shape the development and evolution of behavior.  In addition to discussing his research interests, Dr. Blumberg will also discuss his own training background as well as his views on essential skills for 21st century psychological scientists.  Read his bio HERE.

  • Guest Speaker: George Weiner, MD

    October 23, 2018 - 5:15pm to 6:15pm

    Dr. Weiner will present to the BBIP group on his career path and research program. Dr. Weiner’s research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies, and on development of novel approaches to immunotherapy of lymphoma. He has been continually funded by the NCI since 1991 and has been the PI on the University of Iowa / Mayo Clinic Lymphoma Specialized Program of Research Excellence (P50 CA097274) since it was initiated in 2002. Dr. Weiner’s research extends from basic laboratory investigation to clinical trials. He was the first to demonstrate Toll Like Receptor 9 agonists could be used successfully as immune adjuvants in tumor immunization.